REMOVING LOAD BEARING WALL PROGRESS

REMOVING A LOAD BEARING WALL TO CREATE AN OPEN FLOOR PLAN www.thisminimalhouse.com

Our house had so much potential when we moved in. One thing it wasn't lacking were doors. There were three doors separating the rooms in the main living space (family room, dining room, and hallway). We obviously wanted to eliminate the heavy doors as soon as possible to cut back on squished fingers and toes. It wasn't an ideal layout for young children. Once the doors were gone everything was wonderful, however we still had the center load bearing wall that was completely cutting off the open floor plan potential. 

Removing the actual wall was way easier than we thought it would be. We were required to have a city inspector to oversee the entire process to make sure everything was to code. We don't plan on selling our home anytime soon, but if we did this would be a huge factor in the selling process.

Want to know how we removed our load bearing wall in our brick ranch home? Here's how we did it! First we removed the 2.5in thick wood paneling.

REMOVING A LOAD BEARING WALL IN OUR BRICK RANCH. www.thisminimalhouse.com

Removing the paneling was hands down the most tedious part of the entire project. They weren't playing around when they installed this stuff. It was hardcore, heavy duty, and it wasn't coming down without a fight. The entire paneled wall was secured with 5 inch nails. You can see just how well our house is built with this photo alone.

Next we removed the insulation, as we wouldn't need it anymore once the wall was gone.

REMOVING A LOAD BEARING WALL. www.thisminimalhouse.com

I don't know about you, but I was absolutely loving the exposed beam walls. However this is not what we we're looking for in the end result. The drywall in the opposing room had to be removed next.

REMOVING A LOAD BEARING WALL, AND INSTALLING AN LVL BEAM. www.thisminimalhouse.com

I'll never forget how amazing it felt to see this space as soon as we started knocking the drywall out. It completely transformed the entire house.

Before we could remove the studs in the walls, we needed to build temporary walls to hold it up so we could install our engineered LVL beams. This is a grainy cell phone photo, but it gives you a good idea of the overall process.

INSTALLING AN LVL BEAM. www.thisminimalhouse.com

Once the temporary wall was in place, we we're able to lift up the engineered LVL beams we picked up from our local lumbar yard and secure them into place, allowing us to have an 'open floor plan' that we desired.

I wanted to give you a visual timeline of what this space has transformed into. 

BEFORE

LIVING ROOM BEFORE
FAMILY ROOM BEFORE. www.thisminimalhouse.com

AFTER

INSTALLING AN ENGINEERED LVL BEAM. www.thisminimalhouse.com

CURRENTLY

FAMILY ROOM AFTER www.thisminimalhouse.com

Hands down the fastest, and most life changing project we've done to date. The engineered LVL beams cost us just under $400, making this project SO affordable. If you currently live in a home, that has the potential to be an open floor plan, I highly suggest entertaining tearing down a load bearing wall and installing your own engineered beams. I promise you won't regret it. 

Want to see some updated projects? Check out this $19 Photo ledge we added to our entryway. It's the most viewed project on This Minimal House. Want another wood project? We're currently finishing out basement. You can see more of that update HERE

Thank you so much for stopping by and reading about how we removed our load bearing wall and installed LVL beams. We would love to know if you tackled this DIY project! Let us know in the comments below!

We removed a load bearing wall. This is what happened... www.thisminimalhouse.com